• iPadiPad on top of book

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    Overview

    The iPad is an incredibly versatile tool to add to your UDL toolbox. The iPad provides a variety of built-in features and apps that allow for multiple means of representation and expression. It also has the power be individualized as an assistive tool without labeling students as different when using it.  Because of the rapidly evolving iPad technology, it continues to be an engaging tool that allows for autonomy and collaboration.

    However, it is important to remember that not all students will respond well to the iPad. One of the tenants of UDL is providing options to students. Teachers should be prepared to provide non-iPad options to students as well. Sometimes a pencil and paper are the best tools for a student for a given activity.

    For additional information on accessibility options and the iPad, visit this page.
     

    Multiple Means of Representation

    It is important to provide key information to students in a way that is accessible to all learners by: providing the same information through multiple formats (e.g. visual, auditory) and to provide information that can be easily adjust by the student (e.g. text can be enlarged).   It is also important to provide students with multiple means to clarify and comprehend vocabulary, mathematical expressions and symbols. The iPad is an excellent tool to provide learners with multiple options for access, clarify and comprehend information that is presented to them.
    When using the iPad for instruction and student work, consider these ways to use features of iPad to provide Multiple Means of Representation:
     
     Features:  Examples and How-tos:
    Options to customize the display of information
     Use accessibility settings to customize visual, auditory, touch on the iPad. For example,
    •  Change the size of the text, images using Zoom and/or Large Type
    • Turn on "Speak Selection" to have text read out loud - adjust speaking rate to suit the needs of the learner
    • Adjust audio balance between left & right audio
    Click here for how-to use the Accessibility features of the iPad.
    Options to provide alternatives for auditory information
    • Use screen casts or videos to convey educational materials and/or provide examples of assignments
    • Use speech-to-text options with Siri and/or specific apps to provide text equivalents
    • Use closed captions & subtitles when available (see iPad Accessibility)
    Options for alternatives to visual information
    • Use screen casts, video or audio recording convey educational materials and/or provide examples of assignments
    • Provide students with electronic copies of materials which can be read using Speak Selection (see iPad Accessibility)
    • Use audio text apps such as Learning Ally Audio so students can access written text through human voice recordings
    Options to define vocabulary and symbols
    • Use built-in dictionary and thesaurus to simplify language. (Access in most apps, can be used in conjunction with Speak Selection.)
    • Have students create their own glossaries or reference guides that are incorporate audio and visual cues. (Using notecard apps, note-taking and video apps.)
    Options that clarify syntax and structure
    Create screen casts or videos to clarify syntax (in language or math formulas) as exemplars for students
     
     
     
    Options for decoding text or mathematical notation
    • Provide students with electronic copies of materials which can be read using Speak Selection (see iPad Accessibility)
    • Use audio text apps such as Learning Ally Audio so students can access written text through human voice recordings
     
     
     
    Options that promote understanding across languages
    • Access to online and app-based translations.
    • Customize iPad language settings based on learner needs (see International Settings).
    • Have students create their own glossaries or reference guides that are incorporate audio and visual cues. (Using notecard apps, note-taking and video apps.)
    Options that illustrate key concepts non-liquistically (multiple media)
    Students can create and/or access photo, audio and video representations of key concepts and/or examples of student assignments.

     
     
     
    Options that highlight patterns, critical features and relationships
    • Use Zoom to highlight emphasize key elements in text, graphics, diagrams when presenting information to students.
    • Use Safari Reader feature to emphasize key information and eliminate distractions with on-line materials. (Click here for a demo of Safari Reader)
     
     
     
    Options that guide information processing

    • Use Safari Reader feature to emphasize key information and eliminate distractions with on-line materials. (Click here for a demo of Safari Reader)
     
     
     
     

    Multiple Means of Expression

    The iPad provides amazing avenues for creativity across multiple apps. Often, “traditional” assignments don’t necessarily translate well onto an iPad, but this becomes an opportunity for venturing into Universal Design for Learning and allowing for different means of expression. In addition, allowing for multiple means of expression on the iPad can also give students an opportunity to create pieces in different apps and “smash” them together for a whole new product. Below is a chart that will hopefully help bridge the gap from traditional assignments to iPad use:

     

    Traditional assignment

    iPad Substitute

    Add creativity!

    Smash it!

    Research paper

    Write it in Pages or Google Docs

    Use Explain Everything to create a whiteboard presentation with audio explaining the research

    Draw pictures using an artistic app such as Paper 53; bring pictures into Explain Everything; take final Explain Everything into iMovie to polish it up.

    PowerPoint Presentation

    Create it in Keynote, Google Slides, or Haiku Deck

    Create a ThingLink presentation to add video, links, and more

    Create your own pictures (using a drawing app), videos (using iMovie), and information links (links to short Google Docs), and put it all into a ThingLink

    Oral Presentation

    Speak it into iTalk or Garageband

    Use Adobe Voice to create a polished video with pictures and speech

    Draw pictures using an artistic app such as Paper 53; bring pictures into Explain Everything; take final Explain Everything into iMovie to polish it up.

    Poster

    Create it in an artistic app such as Paper 53

    Create a ThingLink presentation to add video, links, and more

    Create your own pictures (using a drawing app), videos (using iMovie), and information links (links to short Google Docs), and put it all into a ThingLink

    Children’s Book

    Create it in Book Creator or Explain Everything

    Add voice narration in Book Creator or Explain Everything to allow more people to access the new book

    Create the book in Book Creator or Explain Everything adding in personally created videos and images from the camera roll, and then create a movie trailer for the book in iMovie.

     

     
     
     

    Multiple Means of Engagement

    The variety of apps on an iPad can help engage a diverse range of learners and learning styles. For ideas of particular apps that can be used in this way, please take a look at the chart below:

     

    Style

    Engagement Features

    Example Apps

    Visual learner

    Students can watch videos that relate to topics in addition to reading text

    Safari and YouTube are great places to find videos, and students can create videos in iMovie, Explain Everything, and the iPad Camera

    Aural learner

    Text-to-speech on the iPad allow anything to be read aloud to the student

    Text-to-speech can be found in the Accessibility section in the iPad’s settings

    Oral processor

    Students who can perform better by speaking their work rather than writing it can use various apps with the iPad’s microphone to create their products

    Garageband, iTalk Recorder and even Siri’s dictation tool can be used for this.

    Artistic

    Many apps allow students to draw/doodle to best express themselves and engage with the content.

    Paper 53, Notability, and SketchPro can all engage the artistic learner

    Gamer

    Through games and gaming activities, iPads can engage the gamer in the classroom

    Educational games like Pocket Law Firm (for 8th grade social studies), or coding games such as LightBot

    Introvert

    Introverts can participate in classroom activities through response apps and they can backchannel to still participate without feeling drained by the group.

    Socrative and NearPod are examples of response apps, but Google Docs, TodaysMeet and other similar services can all be accessed through the Safari browser.