• Welcome to Discovery English -- Mr. Chamberlain
     
    Check this site for the classroom agenda, homework assignments (and clarifications of them), missed work due to absences, and a POCA (preview of coming attractions). The latest will be up top.  
    I update this webpage often, and students use its links to access curriculum. Classroom expectations slideshow is here
    -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- -- --- --- -- --- -- ---
    If you want to spend more than 10 minutes (as in Back-to-School night) reading about what we do in English, here's the link to Mr. Chamberlain's website (off TeacherWeb). Email me with questions at jchamberlain@lexingtonma.org.  My poetry website is here. I actually don't check my school phone for voice messages (sorry), so if you'd like to talk, please email me and ask for a time to talk.
    -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- ---
    Students often login to their accounts at Quia, an educational website, and Quizlet.
    Both websites can be linked from assignments here or from the Clarke School webpage.
    -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- 
    Here's a link for the descriptive writing / elaboration techniques we will be using this year.
    -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- ---
    Extra credit paragraph form to get points added to a quiz is here
    Please title your Google Docs using this "Color, Name, Assignment Title" format.
    -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- ---
    NYC Trip Dates -- Wed. June 6, Thurs, June 7
    Science Final -- June 3; Math Final -- June ?;  History Final -- June 12 
    Science Field Trip: June 13 and 14 (no on-team classes) English Presentation -- June 17 A&B blocs
    -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- ---  
    General Grading Categories/Weights:  HW: 15%, Reading Quizzes: 15%, Vocab/Grammar: 10%, Class 30%, Writing 30%.
     -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- 
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, June 12
    -- Collect Red Anthologies (81% returned) and TKAM (73% returned).
    -- Each group does a Perspective Statement and a Backdrop. I need to know about your props.
    -- Use our valuable class time well.  We have limited time to prepare for our performance.
        We will have specific groups rehearsing during A or H blocks Thursday and Friday.  See the list.
    -- Act out your scripts (3 times each day), consider cues and clues, make vocal choices and gestures. 
    -- Bring out the theme of "changing or understanding perspectives" (aha moments) as you rehearse.
    -- Take home your Holocaust Projects!  Please!
     
    Homework due Thursday and Friday
    -- Continue memorizing your character lines.  Have someone else help you. Do it in parts.
    -- Return TKAM and your red anthology.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday-Tuesday, June 10-11
    -- Use class time well.  We have three* or four class days to prepare for our performance.
         2 Discovery field trip days, *some have a Mandarin field trip on Tuesday.
    -- Act out your scripts (3 times each day), consider cues and clues, make vocal choices and gestures. 
    -- Bring out the theme of "changing or understanding perspectives" (aha moments) as you rehearse.
    -- Take home your Holocaust Projects.
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, June 7
    -- Use class time well.  We have three* or four class days to prepare for our performance.
         2 Discovery field trip days, *some have a Mandarin field trip on Tuesday.
    -- Act out your scripts (3 times each day), consider cues and clues, make vocal choices and gestures. 
    -- Bring out the theme of "changing or understanding perspectives" (aha moments) as you rehearse.
    -- Blue: finish your quiz in the last 10-15 minutes.
    -- G and H switch, then we go to LHS.
      
    Homework due Monday
    -- Continue memorizing your character lines.  Have someone else help you. Do it in parts.
    -- Bring back your TKAM and red anthology book this week.  
      
     To Kill a Mockingbird Reading Schedule
     Thursday, 5/9  -- --- -- --- -- --- --
     Friday, 5/10  Chapters 3-4 in TKAM
     Monday, 5/13 (Science MCAS)  -- --- -- --- -- --- --     
     Tuesday, 5/14  (Science MCAS)  -- --- -- --- -- --- --
     Wednesday, 5/15  Chapters 5-8 in TKAM
     Thursday, 5/16  (early release day)  Chapter 9 in TKAM
     Friday, 5/17  Chapters 10-11 in TKAM
     Monday, 5/20  Chapters 12-13 in TKAM
     Tuesday, 5/21  Chapters 14 -> 16 in TKAM
     Wednesday, 5/22   Spain trip departs >  Chapters 17 -> 20 in TKAM
     Thursday, 5/23  Chapters 21 - 22 in TKAM
     Friday, 5/24   --- -- --- -- --- -- --- --
     Monday, 5/27  Memorial Day, No School
     Tuesday, 5/28   Quebec trip departs >  --- -- --- -- --- -- --- --
     Wednesday, 5/29  Chapters 23 -> 25 in TKAM
     Thursday, 5/30  Chapters 26 -> 28 in TKAM
     Fri., 5/31 (Spain and Quebec trips return.)  Chapters 29 -> 31 in TKAM
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, May 31
    -- In small groups, enact the scene from Chapter 28.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, June 3
    -- Use class time well.  We have six class days to prepare for our performance.
         (4 days for field trips, some have a Mandarin field trip.)
    -- Choose parts, read scripts (3 times), highlight your parts, consider vocal choices and gestures. 
    -- Yellow finishes the writing about the Verdict.
     
    Homework due Monday
    Review the text for a quiz on Monday.  (Yellow also finishes the writing about the Verdict.)
    Bring back your red anthology book this week.  Red 7, Green 2, Blue 8, Yellow 2
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, May 30
    -- Academic Conversations about questions from the readings.
    -- See selections from the trial scenes and aftermath; discuss.
       Green: at 1:46:48, Red at 1:39:57, 
       Blue ended at 1:48:??;  Yellow at 1:47:03 
    -- Finish writing about the Jury's Verdict and excerpts. (Yellow begins.)
     
    Homework due Thursday
    Read Chapters 26, 27, 28 in TKAM.  
    Bring back your red anthology book this week.  Red 7, Green 2, Blue 2, Yellow 1
     
    Homework due Wednesday
    Read Chapters 23, 24, 25 in TKAM.  
    Bring back your red anthology book this week.  Red 2, Green 2, Blue 0, Yellow 0
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday and Wednesday, May 28, 29
    -- See selections from the trial scenes and discuss.
       Green: at 1:46:48, Red at 1:39:57, 
       Blue ended at 1:35:50;  Yellow at 1:47:03 
    -- See "Loving vs. Virginia" case interactive map (Yellow needs to see this.)
    -- Review sample student writings on GC or here. (Yellow needs to see this.)
    -- Begin writing about the Jury's Verdict and excerpts. (Yellow needs to start this.)
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, May 23
    -- Pick your scene for our "skit to stage" production, read it through once.
    -- See selections from the trial scenes and discuss.
       Green: at 1:40:02 (jury returns), Red at 1:30:26 (we just started comparing T's & M's testimony), 
       Blue ended at 1:17:50;  Yellow at 1:22:515 (during Mayella's rant)
     
    Homework due Tuesday
    None, except catch up night with the reading. 
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, May 23
    -- See the "Mob Scene" and discuss why Scout was better than Atticus.
       Green: ended at 1:15:25, Red ended during Tom's testimony, 
       Blue ended at 1:17:50;
     
    Homework due Friday
    Catch up night with the reading.  
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, May 22
    -- Write about "Maycomb's usual disease" (Blue, Yellow, Green)
    -- Academic Conversations about questions from the readings.
    -- "The Scottsboro Case" as an influence on Harper Lee. Similarities?
     
    Homework due Wednesday
    Read Chapters 21- 22 in TKAM. 
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, May 21
    -- Hear Millay's poem, "The Courage that My Mother Had"
    -- Academic Conversations about questions from the readings.
     
    Homework due Wednesday
    Read Chapters 17- 20 in TKAM.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, May 20
    Please return your copy of Night. As of Monday,: Yellow 19, Green 20, Red 22, Blue 18
    -- Review our team's Holocaust presentations on Google Classroom.
    -- Yellow: Brief reading quiz on Chapters 5-9.  (Open book -- not e-book -- 15 minutes max)
    -- Academic Conversations about questions from the readings.
     
    Homework due Tuesday
    Read Chapters 14, 15, 16 in TKAM. 
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, May 17
    Please return your copy of Night. As of Thursday,: Yellow 19, Green 19, Red 20, Blue 18
    -- Brief reading quiz on Chapters 5-9.  (Open book -- not e-book -- 15 minutes max)
    -- Academic Conversations about questions from the readings.
    -- As needed, reflect on your group's Holocaust Presentation here.
     
    Homework due Monday
    Read Chapters 12, 13 in TKAM. 
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, May 16
    Please return your copy of Night. As of Thursday,: Yellow 19, Green 17, Red 20, Blue 18
    -- Academic Conversations about questions from the readings.
    -- As needed, reflect on your group's Holocaust Presentation here.
     
    Homework due Friday
    Read Chapters 10, 11 in TKAM. 
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, May 15
    Please return your copy of Night. As of Wednesday,: Yellow 13, Green 14, Red 20, Blue 18
    -- Jim Crow South; revisiting Jesus Colon's "Little Things are Big" and the "Universe of Obligation"
    -- Academic Conversations about questions from the readings.
    -- As needed, reflect on your group's Holocaust Presentation here.
     
    Homework due Thursday
    Read Chapters 9 in TKAM.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday and Tuesday, May 13 and 14
    Please return your copy of Night. As of Tuesday,: Yellow 13, Green 14, Red 20, Blue 16
    -- Our focus with TKAM: Identity, Perspective, Empathy, Agency
    -- Academic Conversations about questions from the readings.
    -- As needed, reflect on your group's Holocaust Presentation here.
     
    Homework due Wednesday
    Read Chapters 5-8 in TKAM. 
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, May 10:   
    Q4 Progress Reports released Mon., May 13 
    -- Sign-up for your TKAM book and reflect on your group's Holocaust Presentation here.
    -- Quiz on TKAM, Chapters 1-4 (open book, 15 min.)
    -- Discuss readings with Pear Deck.
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday and Thursday, May 8 and 9:   I won't be here on Wed. after the MCAS. 
    -- Sign-up for your TKAM book and reflect on your group's Holocaust Presentation here.
    -- Green (during WIN), Yellow, Red on Wednesday.  Blue on Thursday.
    -- Go to the "Our Project on the Holocaust" on Google Classroom. We will be finishing / submitting
        our writing from our presentations on Google Classroom. (8 points)
    -- Read in TKAM quietly or aloud to each other in small groups until the end of class. 
     
    Homework due Friday
    Read Chapters 1-4 in TKAM. In Chapter 1, read the first two paragraphs,
       then skip ahead several pages to "Maycomb was an old town, but it was..."
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, May 7:
    -- Bring your Presentation and Artist's Statement to room 351 (Mr. Romulus's room)
    -- Rotation #1 for Discovery:  in 351 (10 minutes).  One person stays with project, others travel.
       Rotation #2 for Discovery:  in 349 (10 minutes).  One person stays with project, others travel.
       Rotation #3 for Discovery: in the IMC (10 minutes).  One person stays with project, others travel.
     
    -- We will return to 107 with 10 minutes to spare, complete our "See/Think/Wonder" sheet, and turn in.
    -- We will sign out our To Kill a Mockingbird (TKAM) books.  Please return Night by Friday.
     
     
    Homework due Friday
    -- Develop your "talking points" during the presentation. 
       Start your Artist's Statements, due Tuesday.
    -- Bring in items that are needed for your project.
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, May 3:
    -- Examine an Artist's Statement (Google Classroom)
    -- Yellow, Red: Holocaust book covers -- symbolism, theme or messages.
    -- Work on your project.  (We have Fri, and Mon. to prepare.)
    -- Articulate your plans for the period with each other and with me.
        Let me know if you need supplies, and please help with clean-up.
     
    Homework due Friday
    -- Develop your "talking points" during the presentation. 
       Start your Artist's Statements, due Tuesday.
    -- Bring in items that are needed for your project.
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, May 2:
    -- Blue, Green: Holocaust book covers -- symbolism, theme or messages.
    -- Work on your project.  (We have Thurs, Fri, and Mon. to prepare.)
    -- Articulate your plans for the period with each other and with me.
        Let me know if you need supplies, and please help with clean-up.
     
    Homework due Friday
    -- Develop your comparison and contrast writings about the images
       for your "talking points" during the presentation.
    -- Bring in items that are needed for your project.
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, May 1:
    -- Review visuals of paintings and photographs about the Holocaust.
    -- Work on your project.
     
    Homework due Thursday
    -- Review Holocaust paintings on GC. 
       Respond in 100+ words to a contrast of two of them, and reply to another's post.
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, April 30:
    -- Listen to Johnny Clegg's "Asimbonanga" on Youtube, point out imagery that you can discuss.
    -- Work on your project.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, April 29:
    -- Review Mr. Werner's talk about his father's experience.
    -- Listen to Peter Gabriel's Biko on Youtube. 
    -- Work on your project.
     
    Homework for Tuesday
    -- Listen to Johnny Clegg's "Asimbonanga" on Youtube.
       Write 50+ words about how Johnny Clegg's "Asimbonanga" helped South Africans remember Mandela.
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, April 26:
    -- Write your compare and contrast about Kimel's poem and Wiesel's text.
    -- For WIN block, go directly to the auditorium for Mr. Werner's talk about his father's experience.
     
    Homework for Monday
    -- Listen to Peter Gabriel's Biko on Youtube.  
       Write 50+ words about how the idea of being an upstander applies to the lyrics.
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, April 25:
    -- Review Primo Levi's "To wash or not to wash" letter.
    -- Begin writing your compare and contrast writing.
     
    Homework for Friday
    -- Work on your compare and contrast writing about Kimel and Wiesel's texts.
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, April 24:
    -- Review the poem by Kimel and contrast it with Wiesel's view.
    -- Resistance in the Holocaust and in Night.
     
    Homework for Thursday
    -- Read Primo Levi's "Survival in Auschwitz" and take notes on the right
       (three reasons why he should wash, three why he shouldn't)
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, April 23:
     
    -- See other memorials for the Holocaust. Begin our project.
     
    Homework for this week
    -- Work on your project (due end of class on Monday, April 29) 
        See the Google Doc about collecting sources, explaining them in a few sentences,
        and gathering materials for your project.
    -- Monday, April 22: Read "The Creed of a Holocaust Survivor," a poem by Alexander Kimil
       Annotate and respond to the questions. 70 words on the right side.  
       You could look here on pages 34, and 66-68 for Wiesel's view of God in the camp.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, April 22:
    -- Friday's WIN block and info about our project.
    -- Discuss the movie, Boy in the Striped PJ's.
    -- Resistance in the Holocaust and in Night.
     
    Homework for this week
    -- Monday, April 22: Read "The Creed of a Holocaust Survivor," a poem by Alexander Kimil
       Annotate and respond to the questions. 70 words on the right side.  
       You could look here on pages 34, and 66-68 for Wiesel's view of God in the camp.
     
    -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- ---  
    Class Agenda, Thursday, April 11:
    -- Quiz on the reading; 12 minutes max, open book.
    -- Review the responses about irony and fire imagery 
    -- Discuss and analyze Chapter 4 and 5 in Night.  Using Pear Deck.
    -- See some of the movie, Boy in the Striped PJ's.
     
    Homework for this week:  Reading in Night:     online text here
    -- due Monday: pages 36-52
    -- due Tuesday: pages 53-69
    -- due Wednesday: pages 70-85
    -- due Thursday: pages 86-103
    -- due Friday: pages 104-115
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, April 10:
    -- Review the Iceberg Theory responses from yesterday.
    -- Discuss and analyze Chapter 3 and 4 in Night.  Using Pear Deck.
    -- See some of the movie, Boy in the Striped PJ's.
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, April 9:
    -- Add a Writer's Statement that identifies what you were trying to emphasize in your poem.
    -- Discuss and analyze Chapter 3 in Night.  Using Pear Deck.
    -- See some of the movie, Boy in the Striped PJ's.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, April 8:
    -- Quizlet Live for the Holocaust terms, review terms
    -- Finish our Found Poems about Mrs. Schächter's Visions.
       Try to include some of the drama of train ride and the realization at the end.
       Type it on a Google Doc and attach (don't submit) it in Google Classroom.
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, April 5:
    -- Asking questions about the reading so far...
    -- Write a "Found Poem" about Mrs. Schächter's vision.
     
    Homework for next week:  Reading in Night:
    -- due Monday: pages 36-52
    -- due Tuesday: pages 53-69
    -- due Wednesday: pages 70-85
    -- due Thursday: pages 86-103
    -- due Friday: pages 104-115
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, April 3:
    -- Discuss Chapter 1 of Night.
    -- Respond to the study questions.
    -- See more of the movie, Boy in the Striped PJ's
      
    Homework for Thursday:   
    -- None (get to sleep early, eat well, recharge yourself and your iPad.)
     
    Homework for Friday:   
    -- Read page 23-35 in Night.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, April 1:
    -- Review Tobsche's story and Children's voices from the Lodz Ghetto
    -- Read "The Teacher" -- one group in front of the class.
    -- Plot Mountain review here.
     
    Homework for Tuesday:   
    -- MCAS Tuesday, so no homework; go to sleep early, and eat a good breakfast.
     
     -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- ---  
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday and Friday, Mar 28:
    -- See more of the film "The Path to Nazi Genocide" and match up the handout items.
    -- Read "The Teacher" -- one group in front of the class.
     
    Homework for Monday:   
    -- Read "Children of the Lodz Ghetto -- about Tobtche and Ghetto "life"
       Respond to the questions at the end.
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Mar 27:
    -- G,B,R: Our use of the computers and the cart.
    -- See more of the film "The Path to Nazi Genocide" and match up the handout items.
     
    -- MCAS Prep Takeaways: Take your time reading the text and answering questions.
       Be very sure about "Part A" questions before looking for Part B evidence support.
       Part B answers should relate closely to Part A answers.
       Some answers will "overstate" / exaggerate points in the text; one will match.
       For "reasoned judgments," look for answers that include words that show evaluation.
     
    Homework for Thursday:   
    -- Read about Krystallnächt -- Andre's Choice in GC
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Mar 26:
    -- Answer the MCAS questions on "What is a Robonaut?" on Socrative. 
     
    -- Read "The Teacher" quietly (no parts yet!) while others are finishing the quiz.
    -- See part of the film "The Path to Nazi Genocide" and match up the handout.
     
    Homework due Wednesday:   
    -- Read "The Painted Bird" (excerpt) by Jerzy Kosinski in GC.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Mar 25:
    -- Write your compare and contrast essay. Elaborate by being specific. Make general, 
        overall points and claims, but finding specific evidence is better than repeating general points.
    -- Include evidence of your brainstorming, such as a T-Bar or table.
    -- Attach your C&C racism essay into Google Classroom. 
    -- If your are done, review the vocabulary for this unit here.
     
    Homework for Tuesday:   
    -- Read "What is a Robonaut?" carefully, several times. (MCAS prep) 
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Mar 22:
    -- Read "How to Create an Enemy" and "The Cold Within" and discuss / take notes.
    -- Write your compare and contrast essay. 
    -- Attach your essay into Google Classroom.  
     
    Homework for Monday:   
    -- Write your compare and contrast essay.  Brainstorm, rough draft...
        We will dedicate Monday's class to finishing it.
       This essay on racism will use 2 of the 4 texts, your choice.
       (One is excerpts from an online article about "Jewish stars.")
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Mar 21:
    -- Remember that vocabulary quizzes can be retaken for full credit during WIN block.
    -- Read "The Sneetches" aloud in groups, discuss, and take notes.
    -- Read "How to Create an Enemy" and "The Cold Within" and discuss / take notes.
    -- Finish revising and attach your essay into Google Classroom during Thursday class.
     
    Homework for Friday:   
    -- Brainstorm (for 15 minutes) using a T-Chart or Venn diagram for a compare and contrast essay. 
       This essay on racism will use 2 of the 4 texts, your choice.
       (One has excerpts from an online article about "Jewish stars.")
       We will continue writing in class on Friday.
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Mar 20:
    -- 1.) Peer reading of our Argumentative Essays. 
    -- 2.) Incorporate the suggestions and feedback, revise. 
            Attach your writing into Google Classroom by Thursday.
             
    Homework for Thursday:   
    -- Read the two poems on racism (on paper) and Dr. Seuss's "The Sneeches" (in GC)
    -- We will attach our writings into Google Classroom during Thursday class.
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Mar 19:
    -- 1.) Quiz on Argumentative Analysis terms. 
    -- 2.) The goal today is to bring in your counterclaim and revise
            Check in with me if you have questions. 
             
    Homework for Wednesday:   
    -- Finish up your Argumentative Essay -- review the rubric and revise.
        Bring in an addressed envelope with a stamp if you are mailing your "action item."
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Mar 18:
    -- 1.) Green: Review MCAS quiz results. 
    -- 2.) See examples of past essay moves.  Open up "Clarke Essay--Superlatives"
    -- 3.) The goal today is to do your concluding paragraph and revise
            Check in with me if you have questions. 
             
    Homework for Tuesday:   
    -- Self-test on the Argumentative Analysis terms on Quizlet -- quiz Tuesday.
    -- Work on your Argumentative Essay -- review the rubric and revise.
        Bring in an addressed envelope with a stamp if you are mailing your "action item."
     
    -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- ---
     
    In September, we are learning about Stereotypes, especially gender and racial stereotyping,
    and examining texts that show this. We are also building understanding of literary devices, such
    as indirect characterization, mood (created by imagery and setting details), symbolism, and irony.
    In October and November, we are reading The Outsiders and continuing to build our awareness
    of inferencing, especially in how it relates to these literary devices. As a project, we staged our own
    version of The Outsiders in the auditorium, presenting 13 scenes with student actors and narrators.
    In December and early January we are exploring how themes are developed in stories and novels,
    building on our prior examination of literary devices.  We are also exploring the concept of a "coming
    of age" story or "bildungsroman" as students read a novel that they have chosen. 
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Mar 13:
    -- 1.) Red, Blue, Yellow: Review MCAS quiz results. 
    -- 2.) See examples of past essay moves.  Open up "Clarke Essay--Superlatives"
    -- 3.) Let me know the format you want to use: a letter to an elected official who represents you,
             a TED talk essay (start with personal anecdotes), an "Op-Ed" essay, or a brochure.
    -- 4.) The goal today is to assemble part of your rough outline (see this document for a rubric and outline).
             Review notes as a whole and look for subtopics or categories for grouping up points
             
    Homework for Thursday:   
    -- Work on your Argumentative Writing Product. 
       Goal: finish your outline and add an anecdote for intro paragraph / section (rough draft) 
     
    Class Agenda Thursday, Mar 14:
    -- Fill out the form on Google Classroom or here.  -- Attach your Outline to GC.
    -- Green: Review MCAS quiz results.
    -- Work on your Argumentative Writing Product. 
       Goal: write your intro paragraph / section (anecdote, background, thesis, map) (rough draft) 
       What solutions can you take action on, advise about, and argue for?
     
    Homework for Friday
    -- Work on your Argumentative Writing Product. 
       Goal: write your first support paragraph / section (rough draft) 
     
    Class Agenda Friday, March 15:
    -- Review student writings on Literacy in GC. 
       (One more similar compare / contrast essay before the MCAS.)
       Please include brief quotations, elaborate, and make comparisons and contrasts.
    -- Work on your Argumentative Writing Product. 
       Goal: write your second support paragraph / section (rough draft) 
     
    Homework for Monday
    -- Work on your Argumentative Writing Product. 
       Goal: write your third support paragraph / section (rough draft) 
    -- Quiz yourself on the Argumentative Analysis terms on Quizlet (quiz Tuesday)
     
    -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- ---
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Mar 12:
    -- 1.) Open-text quiz on the two nonfiction texts about elephants; go to Socrative -- Chamberlain0
             Questions 1-6 are on the first text (helping trunk); questions 7-12 are on the second (Consoling); 
             The MCAS is untimed.  It's 2/3 an test of reading.  Take your time to reread texts (3 times is ideal.)
    -- 2.) Begin writing your "product" -- choose among: a letter to an elected official who represents you,
             a TED talk essay (start with personal anecdotes), an "Op-Ed" essay, or a brochure.
             Add additional questions (or reflections) in the long rows. Questions should be varied:
             not only about facts, stats but also ideas, solutions. 
     
    Homework for Wednesday
    -- Work on your Argumentative Writing Product: 
        Review the TED Talk and NY Times Op-Ed contest link. (Both in Google Classroom)
        I want to know the format for your "product" you want to use on Wednesday. 
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Mar 11:
    -- 1.) Quizlet Live on Argumentative Analysis terms for 10 minutes.
    -- 2.) Continue your research, using your Research Log to collect links, notes and questions. 
             Your goals today are to have six (resourceful*) sources in your log
             and to add two additional questions (or reflections) in the long rows. 
             Questions should be varied: not only about facts, stats but also ideas, solutions. 
             * If a source has little to offer in terms of usable notes, find another.
     
    Homework for Tuesday
    -- Read the two articles on elephants carefully.  MCAS style quiz tomorrow.
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Mar 8:
    -- 1.) Reflection #2 in your Project Journal -- reflect on:
              -- how your research process is going...
              -- the scope of your project -- narrowing down...
              -- who is your audience?
              -- what questions, interests, and feelings do you have? 
              -- how does this motivate you to express yourself and take a stand?
       
    -- 2.) Continue your research, using your Research Log to collect links, notes and questions. 
             Your goal today is to have at least four sources in your log.  (6 total needed)
          
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Mar 7
    -- 1.) Continue your research, using your Research Log to collect links, notes and questions. 
            Look for Currency, Reliability, Authority, and Purpose/Point of View as you research.
     
    Homework for Thursday and Friday
    -- Continue your research; due by Monday. (Essay writing next week.)
       I'll evaluate your engagement in the research phase by reviewing your Research Log.
       Keep in mind that you will need six useful sources in your researching. 
       As questions come to mind, write them down in your log; they help shape your research.
       This is an argumentative essay, not just an informative essay.
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Mar 6
    -- 1.) Attach your "Research Log" to Google Classroom
    -- 2.) See the brief video and write in your "Project Journal"
    -- 3.) Your research, using your Research Log to collect links, notes and questions. 
            Look for Currency, Reliability, Authority, and Purpose/Point of View as you research.
     
    -- 4.) Thursday: Read handout on "Linking to Public Policy"
     
    Homework for Thursday and Friday
    -- Continue your research; due by Monday. (Essay writing next week.)
       I'll evaluate your engagement in the research phase by reviewing your Research Log.
       Keep in mind that you will need six useful sources in your researching. 
       As questions come to mind, write them down in your log; they help shape your research.
       This is an argumentative essay, not just an informative essay.
     
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Mar 5:  D: 11:48-12:16 (Yellow),
    12:18-12:46 (Green)   E: 12:50-1:18 (Blue), 1:20-1:48 (Red)
     
    -- 1.) Blue and Yellow: review video and policy change options.
    -- 2.) Your research, using your Research Log to collect links, notes and questions. 
            Look for Currency, Reliability, Authority, and Purpose/Point of View as you research.
     
    Homework for Wednesday
    -- Continue your research; due by Monday. (Essay writing next week.)
       Keep in mind that you will need six useful sources in your researching. 
       As questions come to mind, write them down in your log; they help shape your research.
       This is an argumentative essay, not just an informative essay.
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Mar 1:
    -- 1.) Ten minutes of Quizlet Live.
    -- 2.) Video that connect issues to policy . (creating a policy, or
            modifying, enforcing, leveraging, or eliminatng an existing policy)
    -- 3.) Your research, using your Research Log to collect links, notes and questions. 
            Look for Currency, Reliability, Authority, and Purpose/Point of View as you research.
     
    Homework for Monday
    -- None, but I want you to be clear about your topic for research.
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Feb 28:
    -- 1.) Review the Student Responses to the Satire and Parody Assessment (GC)
     
    -- 2.) Write about Literacy (two texts, plus the research) about how the lives of Chloe,
       Frederick Douglass, or Ruben (2 of them) are changed because of reading skills.
       Include your research about literacy to add to your discussion.  
     
    -- 3.) Begin your research, using your Research Log.
     
    Homework for Friday
    -- Finish your writing in Google Classroom about Literacy.
       Make sure to bring in some comparisons and contrasts, and add some research.
    -- Continue researching your topic.
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Feb 27:
    -- 1.) Make a copy of the "Research Log" and attach it back.
        I will introduce to you how we will use it.
     
    -- 2.) Write about Literacy (two texts, plus the research) about how the lives of Chloe,
       Frederick Douglass, or Ruben (2 of them) are changed because of reading skills.
       Include your research about literacy to add to your discussion.  
     
    Homework for Thursday
    -- Finish your writing in Google Classroom about Literacy.
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Feb 26:
    -- Review "Three Wise Men" and why the present mattered (or didn't).  
       How do you know Ruben was intrigued by the books?
    -- Research about Literacy -- use links and make notes about your research in literacy here
         Accumulate 4+ different types of evidence -- in your copy of the slideshow. 
     
    Homework for Tuesday
    -- Read the three slides by Frederick Douglass in the slideshow.
       Answer this question in 80 words:
       How did Douglass figure out that reading was a "superpower" with blessings and curses?
    -- Return your "Animal Farm" book to me.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Feb 25
    -- Slideshow (most are included now) of our team's "Graffiti Slides"
    -- Consider: What topic or issue are you genuinely interested in?
    -- On Google Classroom, write a paragraph: identify 1 slide that was especially effective in
        grabbing your attention and concern. What made it effective? Get specific about its points. What
        topics did you find interesting and possibly worth exploring in a "deeper dive" into research? Why?
    -- Read a poem by Harper about literacy among ex-slaves.
      
    Homework for Tuesday
    -- Read "Three Wise Guys" in your Red Anthology, p.7+. 
    -- Return your "Animal Farm" book to me.
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Feb 15
    -- Partial Slideshow (still adding to it) of our team's "Graffiti Slides"
    -- PTSD Research -- make a list of features or symptoms of PTSD. 
         Apply these to Melville's "The College Colonel" -> empathize with him more.
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Feb 14
    -- Plastic Bags analysis of issue and terms here.
    -- Work on your "Graffiti slide" by doing research and arranging your slide.
        Explore 3+ websites to get a more rounded view for "test driving" this topic.
    -- If you are done with your slide: PTSD Research and "The College Colonel"
     
    Homework for Friday
    -- Finish your Graffiti slide. Use the checklist here.
    -- Return your "Animal Farm" book to me.
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Feb13
    -- Review Quiz answers.  (Remember, most answers are in the text.)
    -- Review terms from this unit on Quizlet here.
    -- Plastic Bags analysis of issue and terms here.
    -- Work on your "Graffiti slide" by doing research and arranging your slide.
        Explore 3+ websites to get a more rounded view for "test driving" this topic.
     
    Homework for Wednesday and Thursday
    -- Research a topic and assemble your Graffiti slide. Stay in Google Docs (not Notability).
    -- Return your "Animal Farm" book to me.
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Feb12(35-37 minute classes; early dismissal)
    -- Take an open-book quiz on the nonfiction stories "Building Empathy for the Vulnerable":
        the disabled ("Power of the Powerless"), for immigrants ("Von"), and for wild animals ("The Flood").
    -- Quiz seating arrangements: one person per table side.  Socrative room: Chamberlain0
       Remember the secret (as is true for the MCAS test), that the answers are (shh!) in the text.
    -- When you are done, work on your "Graffiti slide" by doing research and arranging your slide.
     
    Homework for Wednesday and Thursday
    -- Research a topic and assemble your Graffiti slide. Stay in Google Docs (not Notability).
    -- Return your "Animal Farm" book to me.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Feb11:  
    -- Finish the "Final Assessment" on Satire and Parody today.
       Besides quotations for the examples, add discussion.  
       On the back, make sure you discuss how these elements add to the satirical message.
    -- Seating arrangements: use the "quiz-taking seating policy," one person per table side.
    -- Write down 6 topics (3 per "topic splash" slide) that you are interested in.  Here 
    -- Listen to the short video about empathy.   
     
    Homework for Tuesday
    -- Read "The Flood" in your Red Anthology, p. 347+
     
    Homework for Thursday: (even if we have a snow day on Wednesday)
    -- Pick one of the 6 topics/issues and "test drive" one of them
        by make your own graffiti slide. Use the template here.
        On Friday, I will share these out in a larger slideshow to help our
        teammates get familiar with issues that others are interested in.
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Feb 7:  (Mr. Chamberlain is away today.)
    -- Take the "Final Assessment" on Satire and Parody today.
    -- First, get the scripts on paper, then watch Monty Python's "Airline Pilots" (start at 25 seconds)
        and Portlandia's "Whose Dog is This?"  You can watch them more than once if it helps. 
    -- Decide on one and write about one of these two sketches on the sheet provided.
    -- Seating arrangements: use the "quiz-taking seating policy," one person per table side.
    -- Turn this sheet in before you leave the class. Staple your scripts to them.
    -- If you need additional time, you can complete it on Monday.
    -- If you finish early, begin reading "The Flood" in your Red Anthology. 
     
    Homework for Tuesday
    -- Read "The Flood" in your Red Anthology, p. 347+
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Feb 7:  (return your Animal Farm book)
    -- Finish sharing our projects in our class.
    -- Intro the new unit on Civic Activism, Empathy, and Research called "You.gov"
    -- Script for "The Power of the Powerless" and Values
    -- Time permitting: Simpson Satire follow ups
    -- Time permitting: "Getting Wild in the City" song about activism
     
    Homework for Friday
    -- Read "Von" in your Red Anthology, p. 320+
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Feb 6:  (return your Animal Farm book)
    -- Share our projects in our class.
    -- Intro the new unit on Civic Activism, Empathy, and Research called "You.gov"
     
    Homework for Thursday
    -- Read "Power of the Powerless" in your Red Anthology, 668+
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Feb 5(return your Animal Farm book)
    -- Seinfeld's "George's Exploding Wallet" or Portlandia's "Colin the Organic Chicken"
    -- 45 minutes on your creative satirical project.  If you need materials, let me know. Due Wednesday.
       Make progress on your Artist's Statement.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Feb 4:  
    -- The Simpsons:  "Homer Almost Starts a Core Meltdown" 
        What is author/creator Matt Groening satirizing?  How does he do this? (Google Classroom)
    -- 45 minutes on your creative satirical project.  If you need materials, let me know. Due Wednesday.
       Make progress on your Artist's Statement.
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Feb 1:  
    -- The Simpsons:  "Homer Almost Starts a Core Meltdown" 
        What is author/creator Matt Groening satirizing?  How does he do this?
    -- Quiz on Terms for this unit on Socrative. room: Chamberlain0
    -- 30 minutes on your creative satirical project.  If you need materials, let me know
     
    Homework for Monday
    -- Work (and network with your group) on your satire projects.  Due Wednesday.
    -- For the full extra credit, write a paragraph on the targeting, message, and
        methods in Animal Farm, based on a chapter from the 2nd half of the novel.
        See Google Classroom. 
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Jan 31:  
    -- 10 min Quizlet Live.
    -- 15 min open book Socrative quiz on Animal Farm Ch. 6-10. Take this only in class, only once.
    -- 25 minutes on your creative satirical project.  Let me know what your project is today.
     
    Homework for Friday
    -- Work (and network with your group) on your satire projects.
    -- Review vocab for quiz on Friday.  (No pictures will be on the quiz.)
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Jan 30:   (short classes today)
    -- The worms as an image and symbol in "Stalin's Epigram" -> develop a satirical message.
    -- 15 minutes on your creative satirical project.  Let me know what your project is today.
    -- When we have time, Quizlet Live. (No quiz until after we have done Quizlet Live.)
     
    Homework for Thursday
    -- Work (and network with your group) on your satire projects.
    -- Tomorrow we will review (open book quiz on) Chapters 6-10 in Animal Farm.
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Jan 29:   
    -- See Studio C's "Scott Sterling" and review "Presidential Fail"
    -- With "Stalin's Epigram" review how the imagery and connotations develop a satirical message.
    -- Finish our work with Animal Farm, targets and messages for Chapters 2-5.
    -- 20 minutes on your creative satirical project.  By Wednesday, let me know what your project is.
    -- If we have time, Quizlet Live.
     
    Homework for Wednesday
    -- Watch Studio C's 'Alien Internet Invasion" a few times as a satire on the internet. 
       Respond to the questions (in second packet).
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Jan 28:   
    -- Finish our work with Animal Farm, targets and messages for Chapters 2-5.
    -- With "Stalin's Epigram" review how the imagery and connotations develop a satirical message.
    -- Launch the creative satirical project. Brainstorm for 15 minutes about a target, message, and media.
    -- If we have time, Quizlet Live.
     
    Homework for Tuesday
    -- Watch Studio C's "Presidential Fail" as a satire on leadership. Respond to the questions (in packet).
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Jan 25:   
    -- If you are reading Animal Farm for extra credit, take the quiz on Chapters 1-5. (room: Chamberlain0)
    -- Explore the Targets and Messages in certain chapters (1-5) in Animal Farm.
    -- If you are not reading Animal Farm, do the "Pillsbury Doughboy" parody.
    -- Slapstick and irony here in a 1916 Charlie Chaplin silent film, "The Pawnshop" (at 17:30+)
     
    Homework for Monday
    -- Make sure you have finished recent writing assignments, since it's end of the quarter. 
    -- We will do Quizlet Live (here) on Monday and the vocabulary quiz will be on Tuesday.
    -- Extra credit -- keep reading Animal Farm.  An online text is available here.
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Jan 24 Our notes on "Hotel California" here.
    -- Explore "Hotel California" as a satire on "LA's reckless living and how it leads to addiction."
       OR a satire on "commercial greed and the exploitation of idealistic musicians."  
       Find evidence and use the techniques of satire to show how it builds to a message.
    -- Discuss "Us and Them"
     
    Homework for Friday
    -- Respond on Google Classroom to the question about "Us and Them" (a post and reply) 
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Jan 23:
    -- Building Blocks of Satire -- visual used with "Richard Cory"
    -- Explore "Hotel California" as a satire on "LA's reckless living and how it leads to addiction."
       OR a satire on "commercial greed and the exploitation of idealistic musicians."  
       Find evidence and use the techniques of satire to show how it builds to a message.
    -- Socrative quiz on "Us and Them" (only during English class) room name: Chamberlain0
    -- Discuss "Us and Them" as a satire and how it uses irony especially to build it.
      
    Homework for Thursday
    -- Reading quiz on "Us and Them" (open text) Wed. or Thurs.
       (The vocabulary quiz on parody and satire terms will be Monday.)
    -- Find 3 examples of irony and explain these on your pdf (attached to Google Classroom)
    -- Extra Credit: Reading of Animal Farm.  Since most of the team is reading the book,
        we will use classtime to review the book, this Friday (Ch. 1-5) and next Thursday (Ch 6-10).
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Jan 22:
    -- Richard Cory -- satire or ironic tragedy?
    -- Explore "Hotel California" as a satire on "LA's reckless living and how it leads to addiction."
       OR a satire on "commercial greed and the exploitation of idealistic musicians."  
       Find evidence and use the techniques of satire to show how it builds to a message.
    -- We will discuss "Us and Them" on Wednesday, Jan. 23 
     
    Homework for Wednesday
    -- Read "Us and Them" (in Google Classroom).  Reading quiz on story (open text) Wed. likely.
       (The vocabulary quiz on parody and satire terms will be Friday.)
       Find 3 examples of irony and explain these on your pdf (attached to Google Classroom)
    -- Extra Credit: Reading of Animal Farm.  Since most of the team is reading the book,
        we will use classtime to review the book, this Friday (Ch. 1-5) and next Thursday (Ch 6-10).
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Jan 18:
    -- Review writings about the hyperbole connecting Ms. Bindle's sarcasm to Jesse James' sharp-shooting.
    -- Is "The Clown" a satire? Is it exposing and criticizing a folly or vice, something political or an issue?
    -- Caricatures of President Trump -- what messages are the artists intending?
      
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Jan 17:
    -- Respond to the Question on Google Classroom about one of the songs.
    -- Discuss "The Clown" and quiz on it (open book) during class (you can only enter the quiz once)
    -- What elements of satire does "The Clown" and other school cartoons have? 
        Is it a satire? Is it exposing and criticizing a folly or vice, something political or an issue?
    -- If you want to read the rest of "Animal Farm," take it with you today.  If you do not
       want to read it, leave it in class and I will collect them. 
     
     
    Homework for Thursday
    -- Read Chapter 2 in "Animal Farm" (Everyone will read chapter 1 and 2,
        then let me know by Thursday if you want to read the rest for extra credit.)
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Jan 16:  -- Return your Dec. book to me.
    -- Practice our Parody and Satire terms on Quizlet here. (10 min)
    -- Read and listen to "The Sound of Silence" -- what is the message and target?
    -- Respond to the Question on Google Classroom about one of the songs.
     
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Jan 15
    -- get your Reading Bingo card
    -- offering "Animal Farm" as an extra credit, independent reading option (for Q2)
        Read part of Chapter 1 in class. 
    -- Blue and Yellow: Finish hearing Supertramp's "School," a scornful satire
        -- what is its message and target? 
    -- Read and listen to "The Sound of Silence" -- what is the message and target?
     
     
    Homework
    -- Read Chapter 1 in "Animal Farm" (Everyone will read chapter 1 and 2,
        then let me know by Thursday if you want to read the rest for extra credit.)
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Jan 14
    -- Edit and comment on several other students' essays.
       (Do not "Turn In" -- just "Attach" your essay.  Make sure your name is on the first page.)
    -- Satire on Perspectives activity.  "What's wrong with this picture?"
    -- Read the lyrics and hear Supertramp's "School," a scornful satire on society and education.  
     
    -- Slapstick and irony here in a 1916 Charlie Chaplin silent film, "The Pawnshop" (at 17:30+)
     
    Homework
    -- Read "The Clown" in your Red Anthology. p.57+
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday-Friday, Jan 9:  
    -- Use class time productively to write your essay.
        No computers today. Use keyboards with your Ipads.
        For evidence, accuracy, and depth, the story should be open on your desk.
        Attach your essay to Google Classroom so I can have access to it. 
     
        The introductory paragraph needs to include the author, title, sufficient context
        for your reader, your theme statement, and a mapping sentence with 3 subtopics.
    -- Sample map setup:  Through conflict, mood, and symbolism, this character
                                     grows through three stages: through ..... , ...... , and .......
     
    Homework
    -- Write for 30 minutes, hopefully another paragraph for your 5-paragraph essay. 
        See the slideshow on Google Classroom for continued guidance.
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Jan 8:  -- Return your book to me.
    -- Review yesterday -- be selective with evidence -> expand analysis. 
    -- Continue and finish presenting our findings from "No, I Don't" from Speak.
        Keep connecting these to the theme. I'll collect your notes.
    -- Use class time productively to write your essay.  
        The story should be open on your desk.  Ask me for feedback and suggestions.  
        The introductory paragraph needs to include the author, title, sufficient context
        for your reader, your theme statement, and a mapping sentence with 3 subtopics.
     
    Sample map setup:  Through conflict, mood, and symbolism, this character
                                     grows through three stages: through ..... , ...... , and .......
     
    -- Attach your Google Doc into Google Classroom at this point.
     
    Homework
    -- Write another paragraph for your 5-paragraph essay. 
        See Google Classroom for continued guidance.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Jan 7:  -- Return your book to me.
    -- Talk about combining / embedding well-chosen, brief quotations within your analysis.
    -- Mark up the sample paragraph for claim, map, evidence, and analysis.
    -- Present our findings from "No, I Don't" from Speak.
     
    Homework
    -- Write one paragraph for your 5-paragraph essay.  See Google Classroom.
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Jan 4:  -- Return your book to me by Friday this week.
    -- Finish presenting our "Can It" questions and ideas. 
    -- Read "No, I Don't" from Speak and begin discussing the questions relating
         to how the theme is further developed through literary elements and devices.
    -- Begin brainstorming your essay on one of these two stories:
          -- "The Treasure of Lemon Brown" by Walter Dean Myers (p. 17+) 
          -- "The Apprentice" by Dorothy Canfield Fisher (p. 65+) 
     
    Homework
    -- Begin brainstorming your essay on one of the two stories:
        Make a word web for ideas involving three literary elements and devices,
        such as characterization, conflict, mood, symbolism, and how your
        story uses this to develop the theme in three stages.  This will be
        a 5-paragraph essay of 500+ words. 
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Jan 3:  -- Return your book to me by Friday this week.
    -- In class, start reading another of these stories in your Red Anthology, either:
          -- "The Treasure of Lemon Brown" by Walter Dean Myers (p. 17+) 
          -- "The Apprentice" by Dorothy Canfield Fisher (p. 65+) 
          -- "The Moustache" by Robert Cormier (p. 584+) 
    -- Write a theme statement for a story that you have finished.
     
    Homework:  
    -- Finish reading the second of these 3 stories above by Friday.
    -- If you need to revise your project, please do so by Friday.
       (Feedback to your project is on Aspen, and often on email.)
     
    -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- 
    On Monday, January 21, 2019 the Town of Lexington will commemorate Martin Luther King Jr. Day
    with a day of family-friendly volunteer activities supporting the underserved.  http://www.lexingtonmlk.org/
    This year, we would like to ask you to try an exercise called the Race Card Project.
    See: https://theracecardproject.com/and https://theracecardproject.com/high-tech-middle-media-arts/

    Here's what you need to do:  Think about the word "Race". How would you distill your thoughts,
    experiences or observations about race into one sentence that only has six words? 
    Then write a short essay (200-400 words) describing why you chose those 6 words.  
    Once you write your essay, please submit your essays through this link.  
    https://goo.gl/forms/NkzSbXjsSwZ9DvAI2
     -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- 
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Jan 2:  -- Return your book to me by Friday this week. 
    -- Read "Can It," a script from Speak. Groups present responses to questions 1-5. (3 minutes each)
        If an important theme from Speak is "In order to be free of emotional trauma, one needs
        to confront painful memories in awareness and build capacity for self-expression."
        then how does "Can It" and your question about it fit into that theme being developed?
    -- This week, we will be writing about how a theme is developed.
    -- In class, start reading in your Red Anthology, finish for homework tonight, either:
          -- "The Treasure of Lemon Brown" by Walter Dean Myers (p. 17+) 
          -- "The Moustache" by Robert Cormier (p. 584+) 
          -- "The Apprentice" by Dorothy Canfield Fisher (p. 65+) 
    -- Thursday: Identify an important theme in a theme statement. Track how that theme
       is developed through characterization, conflict, and literary devices such as symbolism.
     
    Homework:  
    -- Read one (1) of these three stories above by Thursday.
    -- If you need to revise your project, please do so by Friday.
       (Feedback to your project is on Aspen, and often on email.)
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Dec 21:  -- Bring your book to class every day. 
    -- On paper or here, do the sequencing quiz for the "Coming of Age" story.
    -- Go to the IMC for our project sharing / gallery walk. Sticky note feedback.
    -- To coordinate with other teams, Green English will have first lunch, not third lunch.
       (All other Discovery classes will still have third lunch.)
    -- At the end of class, leave your project with me or share it online with me.
    -- I'll be grading these and catching up on other grading over vacation.
     
    Class Agenda, Wed and Thursday, Dec 19/20:  -- Bring your book to class every day.  
    -- Do the sequencing activity for the "Coming of Age" story pattern here.
    -- If needed, revise your "Found Poem" from your Text.  
    -- Work on your project. Use supplies and ask questions as needed.
    -- Time permitting, read "Eleven" by Archibald Macleish, annotate, and respond to questions.
     
    Homework:  
    -- Work on your project. (We have Tues, Wed, and Thurs to work on our projects.)
        Wed: I will send around a sign-up sheet that informs me about your project plans.
    -- If you want to retake the sequencing quiz Friday, review the stages/ answers on Quia.
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Dec 18:  -- Bring your book to class every day.  
    -- Turn in your "Found Poem" from your Text.
    -- Brainstorm with "From Text to Visuals for our Project" . Select images or scenes
        that are meaningful and connected to an important theme in your novel.
    -- Work on your project. Use supplies and ask questions as needed.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Dec 17:  -- Bring your book to class every day.  
    -- Write / Assemble a "Found Poem" from your Text (turn in before leaving class).
    -- Read in your book, take notes, while I check in with students.
    -- Time permitting, read "Eleven" by Archibald Macleish, annotate, and respond to questions.
     
    Homework:  
    --  Continue reading 1/12 of the book each night.  Finish book by Tues. Dec. 18
    -- Continue using post-its to identify in the text (annotate, taking brief notes):
        5 places that show epiphanies / realizations / aha! moments
        5 places that show the return to society with a new perspective
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Dec 12:  -- Bring your book to class every day.  
    -- Racism in the Classroom in Reardon -- how could students have been Upstanders?
    -- Read in your book, take notes, while I check in with students.
    -- Time permitting, read "Eleven" by Archibald Macleish, annotate, and respond to questions.
     
    Homework:  
    --  Continue reading 1/12 of the book each night.  Finish book by Tues. Dec. 18
        True Diary and Speak pdfs are also on Google Classroom.
    -- Continue using post-its to identify in the text (annotate, taking brief notes):
        5 places that show epiphanies / realizations / aha! moments
        5 places that show the return to society with a new perspective
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Dec 12:  -- Bring your book to class every day.  
    -- Get the Projects Description Handout.
    -- Yellow: Finish our Socratic Seminar using "Coming of Age" stage questions for our novels. Guide here.
    -- Read in your book, take notes, while I check in with students.
    -- Time permitting, read "Eleven" by Archibald Macleish, annotate, and respond to questions.
     
    Homework:  
    --  Continue reading 1/12 of the book each night.  Finish book by Tues. Dec. 18
        True Diary and Speak pdfs are also on Google Classroom.
    -- Continue using post-its to identify in the text (annotate, taking brief notes):
        5 places that show the narrator on a journey
        5 places that show the narrator's challenges, mistakes, and failures on the journey
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Dec 11:  -- Bring your book to class every day.  
    -- Book Fair for part of the class.
    -- Finish our Socratic Seminar using "Coming of Age" stage questions for our novels. Guide here.
     
    Homework:   (We go to the Book Fair on Tuesday.)
    --  Continue reading 1/12 of the book each night.  Finish book by Tues. Dec. 18
        True Diary and Speak pdfs are also on Google Classroom.
    -- Continue using post-its to identify in the text (annotate, taking brief notes):
        5 places that show the narrator on a journey
        5 places that show the narrator's challenges, mistakes, and failures on the journey
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Dec 10:  
    -- Bring your book to class every day in December.  
    -- Socratic Seminar using "Coming of Age" stage questions for our novels. Guide here.
        Three 12-minute sessions, with 4-minute review-and-vote time following each session. 
      
    Class Agenda, Friday, Dec 7:   (short classes)
    -- Bring your book to class every day in December.  
    -- Practice Socratic Seminar with questions about Don Marquis' "lesson of the moth" poem. Guide here.
    -- Using the groups we will use on Monday with our full Socratic Seminar. 
     
    Homework:   
    --  Continue reading 1/12 of the book each night.  Finish book by Tues. Dec. 18
        True Diary and Speak pdfs are on Google Classroom.
    -- Continue using post-its to identify in the text (annotate, taking brief notes):
        5 places that show the narrator as inexperienced and sympathetic
        5 places that show the narrator's conflict with other characters or the society.
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Dec 6:   
    -- Bring your book to class every day in December.  
    -- Review of the field trip.
    -- Forming reading groups -- others reading the same book.
    -- Preparing for Monday's Socratic Seminar: Annotate your text with post-its:
        5 places that show the narrator as sympathetic (reasons we sympathize with them)
        5 places that show the narrator as inexperienced (needs to grow)
        5 places that show the narrator's conflict with other characters or the society.
     
    Homework:   
    --  Continue reading 1/12 of the book each night.  Finish book by Tues. Dec. 18
        True Diary and Speak pdfs are on Google Classroom.
    -- Continue using post-its to identify in the text (annotate, taking brief notes):
        5 places that show the narrator as inexperienced and sympathetic
        5 places that show the narrator's conflict with other characters or the society.
     
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Dec 5:   
    -- Bring your book to class every day in December. Yellow: finish picking a book if needed,
        put your name in it, and I'll write down the number or give it a number on Thursday.
    -- The theme that expressing one's (or a group's) suffering helps the healing process 
       is part of the House of Blues concert and the Holocaust memorial. Write about this,
       with examples, (a Question in Google Classroom) and respond to one student's post.
    -- Read in your book for the duration of the class. Take notes on what makes your
        character inexperienced and sympathetic and on the conflict he or she experiences.
     
    Homework:   
    --  Continue reading 1/12 of the book each night. 
        True Diary and Speak pdfs are on Google Classroom.
     
    -- All classes: Divide the number of your book's pages by 12. This will give you the pages/day
         number so you will be done in time to do a project about it.  You will also be making
         sufficient progress so we can write about its characters, conflicts, etc. early next week. 
    -- If you want a backdrop for your scene in presenting "Dead End" on Thursday,
        find a suitable one and share it with me and I can put it a slideshow.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Dec 3:  Return your Outsiders book.
    -- Bring your book to class every day in December.
    -- Prep for Field Trip about the NE Holocaust Memorial here. Symbolism, expectations... 
    -- Learn about Theme Statements here.
    -- B and R: Brief Reading Quiz on A Wizard of Earthsea, Chapters 1-2
    -- Select and sign out reading books today or Monday.
    -- No Yellow class today.  Lunch -> Auditorium for E block.  Hamilton related.
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Nov 30:  
    -- Prep for Field Trip about the NE Holocaust Memorial. Symbolism, expectations... 
    -- Learn about Theme Statements here.
    -- G and Y: Reading Quiz on A Wizard of Earthsea, Chapter 1-2
    -- Select and sign out reading books today or Monday.
    -- Present our scripts on "Dead End"
     
    Homework over the weekend:
    -- Read Chapter 1 of the book you choose.  (If you aren't crazy about it, you
       likely can select another one early next week.  We will have about two weeks
       to read it.
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Nov 28:   
    -- Continue introducing the concept of the "Bildungsroman" or "Coming of Age" story.
    -- Quick Reading Quiz (B and Y) on and Discuss "Dead End" by Anaya (all).
    -- Script for "Dead End."  What is its theme? How is it developed through mood and symbols?  
     
    Homework due Thursday and Friday:
    -- Due Thursday: read Chapter 1 of A Wizard of Earthsea here or here
       Consider: how Ged is an inexperienced and sympathetic character.
       What is his attitude as a budding wizard?
       Why does he become a local hero but then go away with Ogion?
     
    -- Due Friday: read Chapter 2 of A Wizard of Earthsea here or here
       How does he foolishly fail to appreciate Ogion?
       How is the Incident a turning point that necessitates a journey?
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Nov 27:   
    -- Introduce book choices for next week: Anaya's "Bless Me, Ultima" as well.
    -- Continue presenting symbols and themes in Book Covers from The Outsiders here.
    -- Quiz on and Discuss "Dead End" by Anaya.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Nov 26:   
    -- Introduce book choices for next week.
    -- Themes in Book Covers from The Outsiders here.
        Write your name here twice so you can be part of a group presenting 2 book covers.
     
    Homework due Tuesday:
    - Read "Dead End" by Rudolfo Anaya in Google Classroom.
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Nov 21:
    -- Identify and describe two great moments from the team's scenes from "Inside The Outsiders."
        Explain what made it memorable, powerful, or amusing.
    -- Describe how your scene helped make a theme more vivid.
    -- Irony review from last week here
    -- Time Permitting:  Themes in Book Covers from The Outsiders here.
    -- Return your Outsiders book to me.  Thank you.
     
    -- B and G: Describe how your scene helped make a theme more vivid.
    -- R and Y: Irony review from last week here
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Nov 20:
    -- Slideshows --> pdfs (easier to grade on a laptop)
    -- Practice "scooping" as you read -- read (scoop), look up, speak.
    -- Remember, to be heard downstage or "stage forward"
     
    Our "Inside the Outsiders" play:
    After lunch, meet in the auditorium with your script.
    Quickly go to your seats. Nobody on stage at first.
    Sit with your group as close as possible in the middle section.
    Fold your script up, so it's smaller and makes less noise.
    Onstage, position yourselves downstage or "stage forward."
    Maximize quick positioning, volume, eye contact, cheating out.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Nov 19:
    -- Show me your program from "She Kills Monsters"
    -- Can anyone (1-2 students per class) put together a program?
    -- 20 minutes work on your Outsiders "Chapter Writing" (see here or GC)
    -- Rehearse our scenes in the auditorium.
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Nov 15:
    -- Remind students about the writing (see here) about two Literary Elements or Devices
        (mood, symbol, irony, or indirect characterization -> shows theme development.)
    -- We have done this kind of writing before when writing about symbolism.
    -- Continue staging your scene --> present it to the other groups in class and get feedback.
     
      Guidelines
       Volume, emotion, audience eye contact are important.  "Cheat out" so the audience
          hears and sees you -- even if the scene asks for characters to face each other.
       Get into the play's time period and attitude of your character.
       "Plant yourself" and shake out your hands to dispel tension.
       Make choices that will help the audience appreciate the meaning of your scene.
       Consider stereotyping and how your character buys in it or resists and defies it.
     
    Homework this week:
    -- Due Wed.: Finish your writing on Symbols (smoke rings or broken glass bottles)
    -- For Tuesday: reading quiz on Chapters 9-12 (sorry for the delay). 
    -- Due Tuesday, Nov. 20: writing about your chapter on how a literary element (mood,
         symbol, irony, or indirect characterization) -> shows theme development. 
    -- Extra Credit (show me a program!): see "She Kills Monsters" 7:00 Thurs, Fri., Sat. at LHS, $5.00
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Nov 14:
    -- Remind student writing (see here) about two Literary Elements or Devices (mood, symbol, irony,
        or indirect characterization -> shows character development or theme development.)
    -- Rehearse scripts several times for our "Page to Stage" performances with The Outsiders.
    -- Continue blocking and staging your scene. Volume, emotion, audience eye contact are important.
    -- Green, Red, Yellow: "Soda in the Middle" and mood.
      
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Nov 13:
    -- Introduce writing (see here) about two Literary Elements or Devices (mood, symbol, irony,
        or indirect characterization -> shows character development or theme development.)
    -- Select scripts for our "Page to Stage" performances with The Outsiders.
    -- Begin rehearsing in our groups. Try to read each scene through 3 times.
        Ideally, start blocking your scene. Volume, emotion, eye contact are important.
      
    Class Agenda, Friday, Nov 9:
    -- Intro to our "Page to Stage" performances with The Outsiders.
    -- Assessment about Symbols in Google Classroom.
       Consider what these symbols tells us about Ponyboy and themes in the novel.
       Try to show stages (1st > 2nd smoke ring, or Pony's attitude toward the broken bottle)
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Nov 8:
    -- Greaser-Soc Photo Opp
    -- Assessment about Symbols in Google Classroom.
       Consider what these symbols tells us about Ponyboy and themes in the novel.
       Try to show stages (1st > 2nd smoke ring, or Pony's attitude toward the broken bottle)
     
    Class Agenda, Wedneday, Nov 7:
    -- Movie: Visiting Johnny and Dallas in the hospital.
    -- Assessment about Symbols in Google Classroom.
    -- Friday: Review Irony, the terms we need to use and in relation to The Outsiders.
     
    Work for class, WIN block and at home
    -- Soc - Greaser Dress Up Day on Thursday
    -- By Friday, read Chapter 12 (end of book). 
    -- Bring in Food Drive items if you can (music in hallways?)
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Nov 5:
    -- Get your Symbolism presentation notes back (save these)
    -- Review our symbolism responses in general.  
       We'll be assessing on symbolism further on Wednesday.
    -- Learning about Irony, reasonable expectation and opposite outcome.  
      
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Nov 1:
    -- "Welcome to the '60s" -- how does Tracey get Edna to strut her stuff?
        Notice the stages of how Edna resists at first (the evidence may be in her "business"
          as well as her speech or singing) and then how she begins to open up.
    -- Quiz on Chapters 5-8 here, then "Crumple and Shoot"
     
    Homework:  -- Bring a snack and a bag lunch.  Hairspray slideshow FYI here.
    -- By Friday: Pony's Talk with Randy (Google Classroom)
    -- Bring in Food Drive items if you can.
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Oct 31:   -- Turn in more "House of Blues" forms and waivers.
    -- Read your classmates responses about fire as a symbol.
    -- Push ahead with the movie. 
    -- Discuss and write about Pony's talk with Randy (slideshow here and on GC)
     
    Homework:  -- "House of Blues" Field Trip forms and waivers due Friday.
    -- By Friday: Pony's Talk with Randy (Google Classroom)
    -- By Wednesday: Read Chapter 9. 
    -- By Friday: Read Chapter 10,11. 
    -- Bring in Food Drive items if you can.
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Oct 30:   
    -- Turn in more "House of Blues" permission forms and waivers.
    -- Present more group work on symbols of Innocence in The Outsiders.
    -- Begin exploring Pony's talk with Randy here.
    -- Push ahead with the movie. 
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Oct 29:   
    -- Request for more "House of Blues" permission forms and waivers.
    -- Finish group work on symbols of Innocence in The Outsiders.
    -- Some groups will present -- be prepared.
    -- Push ahead with the movie. 
     
    Homework:  -- "House of Blues" Field Trip forms and waivers due Friday.
    -- By Monday: Exploring the Symbolism of Fire (Google Classroom)
    -- By Tuesday: Read Chapter 8. 
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Oct 26:   
    -- Review of the lamb symbolism in Blake's poem.
    -- Preview the homework about "the fire scene."
    -- Introduce the "twirly ride" symbol as representing loss of innocence.
    -- Group work on symbols of Innocence in The Outsiders.
     
    Homework:  -- "House of Blues" Field Trip forms and waivers due Friday.
    -- By Monday: Exploring the Symbolism of Fire (Google Classroom)
    -- By Tuesday: Read Chapter 8. 
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Oct 25:   
    -- Quizlet Live -> Vocabulary Quiz here
    -- G/B: "Shut Up about Last Night" and how they are reflecting.
    -- Symbolism analysis: an innocent lamb in Blake's poem.
     
    Homework:  -- House of Blues Field Trip forms and waiver due Friday.
    -- On Thursday: Vocab quiz on terms and words.
        (Attach HW about "Nothing Gold Can Stay" if necessary.)
    -- By Friday: Read Chapter 7. 
    -- By Monday: Read Chapter 8. 
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Oct 24:   
    -- Review of Terms and Write about Johnny's internal conflict and growth
    -- Script on "Shut Up about Last Night" and how they are reflecting.
    -- Discussion about Frost's poem, its allusion, imagery, symbolism.
      
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Oct 23:   
    -- Yellow: finish the notetaking activity with the Universe of Obligation
    -- Review of Terms and Write about Johnny's internal conflict and growth
    -- Write about the two sides of Cherry's internal conflict.  
        Bring in textual evidence and discussion from both sides.
    -- Movie catch-up -- get into Chapter 5. Discuss symbols in the movie.
     
    Homework
    -- By Tuesday: Read Chapter 6. 
    -- By Wednesday: Examine "Nothing Gold Can Stay" -- see Google Classroom.
    -- On Thursday: Vocab quiz on terms and words.
    -- By Friday: Read Chapter 7. 
    -- By Monday: Read Chapter 8. 
     
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Oct 22:   
    -- Monday: Review "Outsiders, #2 Terms and Words" here.
       Review terms and notetaking relating to The Outsiders, set #2 (here)
    -- Review parts of Chapter 2, 3 and 4.  Review this book/movie slideshow.
    -- Time permitting: Cherry's Conflict when saying goodbye to Pony.  
    -- Yellow: Quiz on Chapters 1-4 (open book) -- Link is in Google Classroom.
    -- Time permitting: Scripts and discussions -- Chapter 2 and 3.
      
    Class Agenda, Friday, Oct 19:   
    -- Review parts of Chapter 3 and 4.  Review this book/movie slideshow.
    -- Finish writing about what's missing from the movie (chapters 1-3) (GCQ) -- post and reply.
    -- Quiz on Chapters 1-4 (open book) in Quia here
    -- Writing: Cherry's Conflict when saying goodbye to Pony.  <-- This is not homework.
     
    Homework:  
    -- By Monday: Read Chapter 5.
    -- By Friday: Write and reply about "what's missing from the movie" (chapters 1-3).
    -- Return your signed field trip form for Hairspray to your homeroom.
    -- By next Friday: Return your signed field trip forms for The House of Blues to me.
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Oct 18:   
    -- Fill out your request for Group Partners here.
    -- Blue and Green -- get a "House of Blues waiver form" (to be signed) 
       (Return your House of Blues field trip forms and waivers to me.)
    -- Finish seeing movie up to where Pony runs off with Johnny.
    -- Write about what's missing from the movie (chapters 1-3) (GCQ) -- post and reply.
    -- Friday: Scripts and discussions -- Chapter 2 and 3.
    -- Friday: Quiz on Chapters 1-4 (open book) in Quia here.
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Oct 17:  
    -- Take out the December Discovery Team "House of Blues+" Field Trip Forms; be informed!
        Please cross out the word "approximately"  (The cost is $24.)
    -- Green: Write notes on Pony and Cherry's friendship on a half sheet. 
    -- Continuing with the movie.  What is missing?
    -- Reflect on the Director's Choices here.
     
    Homework:  
    -- Read Chapter 4 by Thursday.
    -- Return your signed field trip form for Hairspray to your homeroom.
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Oct 16:    
    -- Review the readings about changee 
    -- Personification Activity #2 on Quia here
    -- Discuss Pony and Cherry's growing friendship and "common ground" between them.
    -- See more of how the movie starts.  What is missing from how the book begins?
      
    Class Agenda, Monday, Oct 15:  -- Collect more composition notebooks. 
    -- Related Reading: "Immortality" by Lisel Mueller (10-15 min) 
    -- Quizlet Live for about 15+ minutes.
     
    Homework:  -- Go to our Team Google Classroom and fill out the form for Wed. WIN
    -- Return your signed field trip form for Hairspray to your homeroom.
    -- Bring in your "composition notebook"; put your name and English color on it.  
    -- For Monday, read Chapter 3 in The Outsiders.
    -- For Mon and Tues, review The Outsiders vocab here. (QLive Mon, Quiz Tues.)
    -- If you don't have your book available, you can read here
       There are audio versions of The Outsiders on Youtube.
     
    -- Review our writings for imagery and mood in Chapter 1. (10-15 min) 
    -- Highlight the imagery in the "Dangerous Dally" script.  (10 min)
    -- Review Chapter 2 discussions.
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Oct 12
    -- Review how imagery reveals attitude and mood in Chapter 1. (10)
    -- In Google Classroom, finish your paragraph about how imagery or setting
          details create a mood or attitude and reply to one person's post.  (10)
           tense -> relaxed -> angry / disappointed
    -- Script for "Dangerous Dally" in Google Classroom
    -- Monday: Begin group work about characterization.  One person in your group open this;
         make a copy and then share that slideshow with others in your group and with me. 
     
    Homework:
    -- Return your signed field trip form for Hairspray to your homeroom.
    -- Bring in your "composition notebook"; put your name and English color on it.
    -- For Thursday, read Chapter 1 in The Outsiders.  
    -- For Friday, read Chapter 2 in The Outsiders.
    -- For Monday, read Chapter 3 in The Outsiders.
    -- For Mon and Tues, review The Outsiders vocab here. (QLive Mon, Quiz Tues.)
    -- If you don't have your book available, you can read here
       There are audio versions of The Outsiders on Youtube.
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Oct 11:  
    -- Review the Outsiders vocabulary here.  (10 min)
    -- Discuss how imagery reveals attitude and mood in Chapter 1.
    -- In Google Classroom, write a paragraph about how imagery or setting
        details create a mood or attitude and reply to one person's post.
           tense -> relaxed -> angry / disappointed
    -- Read in Chapter 2.
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Oct 10:  
    -- Review notetaking expectations in class.
    -- Green: take notes on Darry and Soda as contrasting characters. (10 min) 
    -- Read the Script for Chapter 1 in The Dialogue; discuss and take notes on the questions.
    -- Attach your "Lottery" writing in Google Classroom. Highlight your claim in blue.
      
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Oct 9:  
    -- Begin with a Figurative Language activity here. (5-8 min)
    -- Get a copy of The Outsiders. Read in Chapter 1. (15 min)
    -- Take notes on Darry and Soda as contrasting characters. (10 min) (GREEN Wed)
    -- Work on your writing about The Lottery.  Again, refer to this slideshow.  (15 min)
        On your desk, have the story itself and any related handouts.
        I am happy to read your drafts and offer feedback.
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Oct 5:  
    -- FYI, Field Trip on Nov. 2 to see Hairspray at North Shore Music Theatre. 
    -- Open text (paper) reading quiz on "The Lottery" here.
    -- As needed, continue discussion of story vs. movie of "The Lottery" (here)
         What does it do well?  What's missing from it?
    -- Continue writing about "The Lottery."  As before, refer to this slideshow.  
    -- Check homework and Activity on Selecting Strong Evidence here
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Oct 4:  
    -- Thursday: See a movie of "The Lottery" here.
         What does it do well?  What's missing from it?
     
    Homework:
    -- By Friday, search for and write down (ideally, on a Google Doc) 3+ pieces of evidence
        (directly quoted) from the text to support one of the claims on slide 2 of this slideshow. 
    -- By Wed. (no school Mon., so it's HW on Tues. night), finish your "Lottery" writing.
       Slide one of this slideshow has the prompt and expectations -- writing about
       something that is missing... mood, symbols, characterization, etc.
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Oct 3:  
    -- Panel Discussion -- two rounds: 1-5, plus Katie Perry in "Roar,"
        then 6-10+ "Woman in the Snow" characters if we have them.
        Stay in character.  Each character should get two questions.
     
    Homework:
    -- By Friday, write about "The Lottery."  Refer to this slideshow. 
       Slide one has the prompt and expectations -- writing about
       something that is missing... mood, symbols, characterization, etc.
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Oct 2
    -- Quiz on vocab words from our "stereotype stories" here.
    -- Review what was missing -- write about that.  Refer to this slideshow.
    -- Challenging Stereotypes with "Kids Meet..." videos.
     
    Homework:
    -- Come up with questions for our Panel Discussion on Wednesday.
    -- Reflect on and review your character if you are presenting in the panel.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Oct 1
    -- As needed, add to the Google Classroom Question. See this slideshow.
    -- Decide what's missing from your full experience of The Lottery.
    -- Quizlet review with the words from our stories here. (10)
     
    Homework:
    -- Prepare for the vocabulary quiz on Tuesday. You can practice here on Quia or on Quizlet here.
    -- Come up with questions for our Panel Discussion on Wednesday.
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Sept 28:  (All Mood in "Little Things are Big" writings are graded.)
    -- Review the worksheet and the terms related to "The Lottery."  (10 min)
    -- In groups, identify six plot events in "The Lottery" -- 4 minutes on your own,
        5 minutes in groups, then 6 minutes as a whole class, fill in gaps on your sheet.
    -- Decide what's missing from your full experience of the story.
     
    Homework
    Make sure you have responded to one other student's point from Thursday's writing activity.
        For the four ponts, do more than just agree or note something that was missing.
        Interact with the ideas that your classmate has put out there.
    Vocabulary quiz on Tuesday, so you could review the terms on Quizlet.
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Sept 27:  
    -- Reminder: when "half-sheet HW writings" are returned, put them in your plastic sheet protector.
    -- Finish reading "Woman in the Snow" scripts
    -- Respond to the question on Google Classroom and respond to one other student's point.
       How does Grady look at black people or Eula Mae with a stereotypical single story?  Or how does Ray
        not view blacks or Eula Mae in that way? Find an example and discuss.  Respond also to one other
        person's post by acknowledging that student's point, elaborating further, or making a connection.
    -- In your groups, identify six plot events in "The Lottery"
     
    Homework
    Do questions 1-5 on the double-sided sheet about "The Lottery."
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Sept 26:  
    -- Reminder: when "half-sheet HW writings" are returned, put them in your plastic sheet protector.
    -- Review vocabulary words related to Stereotyping here. (5-10)
    -- Red feedback from Otoonah scenes here.  Blue here. Green here. Yellow here . (5-10)
    -- Read "Woman in the Snow" as a script and discuss how the "single story" danger applies.
        (Roles: if you are a particular narrator, you also have the role of the person to its right.)
     
    Single Story: labeling someone with only one characteristic or perspective and being blind to a wider view.   
    How does Grady view black people with a single story?  How is Ray different?
     
    Homework
    -- for Thursday, read Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery" (handout).
       Read 1/2 Tuesday night and the second half Wednesday night.
       Respond to the questions in the boxes as or just after you read.
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Sept 25:  
    -- Review of HW. Using one element of STEAL to contrast characters.
    -- "Otoonah" scripts -- presenting your part to the class. Stay in character.
        Consider how you want your character indirectly presented or, if you are a narrator,
         how you want the mood to be experienced. Use gestures and vocal choices.
         After groups present, the audience responds here.   Grouping requests here.
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Sept 24:  
    -- Vocabulary quiz, "Just Walk on By" words on Quia here.
    -- "Otoonah" scripts rehearse and start presenting your part to the class
        Consider how you want your character indirectly presented or, if you are a narrator,
         how you want the mood to be experienced. Use gestures and vocal choices.
         After groups present, the audience responds here
     
    Homework
    -- Yellow:  Review "Otoonah" p. 769+ . Then write, using one category from STEAL,
        about how Otoonah and her brothers are characterized differently.
    -- Blue, Green, Red: Finish reading / review "Woman in the Snow," p. 775+ . Then write,
       using one category from STEAL, about how Grady and Ray are characterized differently.
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Sept 21:  
    -- Update: I've graded Yellow's and Red's writing on Mood in "Little Things Are Big" 
    -- Open text (p. 769+) reading quiz for "Otoonah" here (15 min)
    -- Discuss last night's HW -- the mood of "Just Walk On By" through vocab especially. (5 min)
    -- Building empathy for the Hostess, Jesus Colon, the "Roar" character, and others.
    -- Present our Otoonah scripts. (20 min)
     
    Homework
    Vocabulary quiz on "Just Walk on By" words on Monday (review on Quizlet)
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Sept 20:  
    -- Introduce the homework -- mood in the vocabulary words.
    -- Review how Otoonah breaks through the stereotype.  -- Building empathy.
    -- Practice our Otoonah scripts. (20 min)
    -- Quizlet review of "Just Walk On By" vocabulary here. (20 min)
     
    Homework
    Write a paragraph about the mood in "Just Walk On By" (half-sheet)
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Sept 18:  
    -- Vocabulary work with "Just Walk on By"
    -- Finish writing about how imagery creates mood in "Little Things are Big" (see this)
        Attach (please do not "turn in") your paragraph to Google Classroom.
    -- Discuss "Otoonah" and gender stereotypes; time permitting, read the script
    -- Thursday: Present your scene and open book reading quiz on "Otoonah"
     
    Class Agenda, Monday, Sept 17:  
    -- Get your "Little Things are Big" questions back.
    -- Write about how imagery creates mood in "Little Things are Big" (see this)
    -- I'll give you more time Tuesday to finish this and to attach your paragraph to Google Classroom.
     
    Homework
    -- Due Tuesday: Read "Otoonah" in your Red Anthology, pp. 769.
    -- Write down one question you have about the story and 70+ words
       about how Otoonah is given and breaks the gender stereotype.  
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Sept 14:  
    -- Feedback on our "Street Calculus" paragraphs.
    -- Introduce "Academic Conversations" here.
    -- Discuss "Just Walk On By" the article by Brent Staples
       Share and present your responses with the class. 
    -- Monday: Return to our "Roar" graphic organizer.  Please emphasize
        how the imagery helps to create the mood in the three sections of the "story."
     
    Homework
    -- Due Tuesday: Read "Otoonah" in your Red Anthology, pp. 769.
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Sept 13:  (short classes)
    -- See and discuss "Street Calculus" in light of last night's reading.
    -- Respond in writing to any four of the questions.
     
    Homework
    -- Due Friday: Respond to any five the questions on "Just Walk On By"
       (There actually are 10 total on the two pages; only do 5, but do those thoroughly.)
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Sept 12:  
    -- Get a plastic sheet protector and put your Stereotype quiz in it.
    -- Share our stories about stereotypes -- we will walk about the room
       and read as many as we can in about 10-15 minutes.  Add a header (your name,
       our English class color, the assignment title) and "Attach" it to Google Classroom.
    -- Take out your "Roar" lyrics and fill out the graphic organizer about "Roar."
       Bring in examples where the imagery sets the mood and helps us understand her challenges.
     
    Homework
    -- Due Thursday: Read "Just Walk On By" by Brent Staples (handout)
    -- Due Friday: Respond to five of the questions on "Just Walk On By" 
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Sept 11:  
    -- Review your writing about "The Danger of a Single Story" (and what makes for helpful elaboration)
    -- Review how "Roar" explores and challenges two stereotypes (beginning and end).
    -- 10 minute check in about your writing: Fictionalizing is fine.
        Write about a time when someone else has focused on a "single story" about you. OR
        Write about a time when you have told a "single story" about someone else.
        If you have characters, try to add dialogue to make them fresh and lively.
     
    Homework due Wednesday
    -- Write about a time regarding a single story. (220+ words); due Wednesday.
        This can be fictionalized. Brainstorm on the paper; type it up Tuesday night. 
        Attach but do not "submit" it on Google Classroom.
     
    Class Agenda, Friday, Sept 7:  
    -- Quiz on the definition of Stereotype.
    -- Hear "Roar" by Katie Perry.  How does it show and challenge stereotypes?
    -- Discuss "Little Things Are Big" (I will collect homework) (vocabulary terms here)
        time permitting, discuss a character's "internal conflict" and "Universe of Obligation"
    -- Hear more of Chimamanda Adiche's "The Danger of a Single Story"
        Write about a time when someone else has focused on a "single story" about you. OR
        Write about a time when you have told a "single story" about someone else.
      
    Class Agenda, Thursday, Sept 6:  
    -- Review definition of Stereotype; write it out
    -- Hear Chimamanda Adiche's "The Danger of a Single Story"
        Write about a time when someone else has focused on a "single story" about you. OR
        Write about a time when you have told a "single story" about someone else.
    -- Friday: Discuss "Little Things Are Big" (I will collect homework) (vocabulary terms here)
        time permitting, discuss a character's "internal conflict" and "Universe of Obligation"
     
    Homework due Friday or next week
    -- Finish memorizing the definition of stereotype.  Quiz Friday.
    -- Write about a time regarding a single story. (220+ words); due Wednesday.
        This can be fictionalized. Brainstorm on the paper; type it up Tuesday night. 
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, Sept 5:  
    -- Review more classroom expectations, especially the Homework Grade Scale of 1-5.   
    -- R: Read "The Dinner Party" by taking parts; write the definition of Stereotype
    -- G,Y,B,R: review definition of Stereotype
    -- Discuss "Little Things Are Big" (check homework; vocabulary terms here)
        time permitting, discuss a character's "internal conflict" and "Universe of Obligation"
     
    Homework for Thursday, September 6
    -- Read "part 2" of "Little Things are Big" and respond to 2 of the 3 questions (your choice)
     
    Class Agenda, Tuesday, Sept 4:  ("Electronic Housekeeping Day")
    -- Open up your Lexingtonma.org Google Account and join our Google Classroom √ R,Y,G
    -- Blue English Quizlet signup here. (Please have at least part of your name in your account name.) √ G,R,Y,G
    -- Sign on to Quia Web here and read "Girl in the Lavender Dress" p. 710 √ G,R,Y,G
    -- Read "The Dinner Party" by taking parts √ G,Y,B
    -- Write down the definition of Stereotype √ G,Y,B
    -- Blue: Get familiar with the units in 8th grade English. 
    -- Review more classroom expectations. Grades, Group Work...   
    -- Discuss Vonnegut's "Long Walk to Forever."
     
    Homework for Wednesday, September 5
    -- Complete the online Technology Permission Form.
    -- Read "Little Things Are Big" by Jesus Colon and respond to questions 1, 3, 4.
      
    -- --- -- --- -- --- -- ---
     
    Class Agenda, Thursday, August 30:
    -- Get your copy of the Red Literature Anthology.  Take it home.
    -- Read "The Dinner Party" p. 509, and discuss.
    -- Blue: Get familiar with the units in 8th grade English.   
    -- Review more classroom expectations.   
    -- Finish reading Vonnegut's "Long Walk to Forever" and discuss.
     
    Homework for Tuesday, September 4
    -- Complete the online Technology Permission Form.
    -- Enjoy your long weekend.  
     
    Class Agenda, Wednesday, August 29:
    -- Get familiar with the units in 8th grade English.   G,R,Y √
    -- Review classroom expectations.   B,G,R,Y √
    -- Practice lining up alphabetically by the door.    B,G,R,Y √
    -- Begin reading Kurt Vonnegut's "Long Walk to Forever."   B,G,R,Y √
     
    Homework for Thursday, August 30
    -- Review the Classroom Expectations slide 1-17 here. Ideally, have your parents see these, too.
    -- Please save your "Who Are You at the Start of 8th Grade?" sheets
    -- Complete the online Technology Permission Form.
     
    synetics: (from synectikos, a Greek term) = to bring different things into unified connection